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Asiatika

Von indien bis japan, über china, korea und die länder südostasiens: die auktionen von arts d'asie bieten einen umfassenden überblick über die kunst des fernen ostens. Skulpturen, gemälde und kunstgegenstände von der jungsteinzeit bis heute sind in den auktionen zugänglich.
Insbesondere die schätze aus dem reich der mitte: keramiken der chinesischen tang- und song-dynastien, "blau-weißes" porzellan der yuan-, ming- und qing-dynastien, jadeobjekte der ming- und qing-dynastien, gemälde der tang-dynastie, pferde der han- und tang-dynastien und objekte von gelehrten. Auf den auktionen für asiatische kunst finden liebhaber auch buddhistische vergoldete bronzen, drucke und lackobjekte aus japan, statuetten. Indische bronzefiguren, koreanische keramiken usw. Wussten sie? Angetrieben durch das schnelle aufkommen von großem vermögen in china, ist die kunst aus asien seit 2005 auf dem vormarsch und das asienfieber hat die auktionen von hongkong bis paris erfasst. So wurde im hotel drouot im dezember 2016 ein chinesisch-kaiserlicher stempel aus der qianlong-zeit (1736-1795), der auf 800.000 bis 1 million euro geschätzt wurde, auf 21 millionen euro hochgetrieben - ein weltrekord!

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STATUETTE DE PANJARANATA MAHAKALA EN ALLIAGE DE CUIVRE DORÉ TIBET, XIVE SIÈCLE - STATUETTE DE PANJARANATA MAHAKALA EN ALLIAGE DE CUIVRE DORÉ TIBET, XIVE SIÈCLE Himalayan Art Resources item no. 4605 16 cm (6 1/4 in.) high Footnotes: A GILT COPPER ALLOY FIGURE OF PANJARANATA MAHAKALA TIBET, 14TH CENTURY 西藏 十四世紀 銅鎏金寶帳大黑天像 Provenance: With Claude de Marteau, Brussels, by 1970s Holding a flaying knife, skull cup, and club used to annihilate karmic defilements, Panjaranata Mahakala is the fierce guardian of the Hevajra Tantra and the chief protector of the Sakya school of Tibetan Buddhism. Despite his violent iconography, the artist refrains from depicting Panjaranata Mahakala with gruesome features, instead casting an approachable dwarf-like figure with a handsome face and a subdued grimace, understanding the deity's formidable, but ultimately protective, demeanor. Such an exceptional gilded bronze would have required an experienced and dexterous hand, evinced by Mahakala's stocky yet balanced proportions, the snakes coiled around his earrings, the irregular rippling of his scarf, and a corpse whose hair hangs over the side. Moreover, the thickly-beaded lower rim of Mahakala's lotus base is a distinct feature of Pala-period bronzes, comparable to several examples published in von Schroeder, Indo-Tibetan Bronzes , Hong Kong, 1981, pp. 290-1, nos. 73A, B, G, & H). This familiarity with Northeast Indian decoration, combined with the chased striped fur of Mahakala's tiger pelt, suggests that this image was created by a Nepalese artist on behalf of a Tibetan patron during the 14th century. Compare with an image of Takkiraja, whose apron and scarf ends are subtly decorated with small chased lines, published in Grewenig & Rist, Buddha: 2000 Years of Buddhist Art , 2016, p. 396, no. 171. And more importantly, compare the similar jolly countenance and swirling striped pattern of a tiger skin worn by a 14th-century Panjaranata in parcel-gilt, published in Rhie, Wisdom and Compassion , 2000, p. 444, no. 198 (67C). The focus of a state cult as the Mongol Empire's tutelary deity, Mahakala was credited with their defeat of the Southern Song dynasty (1127–79), solidifying Khubilai Khan's legitimacy as the first emperor of the Yuan dynasty (1271–1368). Images like the present lot, which were likely made at the height of Sakya authority in Tibet, later informed the art of the early Ming dynasty, whose emperors sought to harness this esoteric power for themselves. For example, compare the present lot's densely-packed lotus petal base to a gilt-bronze from the Yongle period (1403–24), published in von Schroeder, Buddhist Sculptures in Tibet , Vol. 2, Hong Kong, 2001, p. 1239, nos. 348A-B. For further information on this lot please visit Bonhams.com Excellent overall condition, with minor dents to the gandhi stick and two leaves of the crown to the viewer's right, as is visible in images. Very minor loss of gilding intermittently throughout as a result of ritual handling within the culture. Embedded organic material and smoky residue from exposure to temple lamps in recessed areas. Remains of red pigment to his hair, eyebrows, and mouth. The base is sealed with its original and undisturbed consecration plate and there is an auditory indication of consecration materials inside the base. There is also an undisturbed circular consecration plate located at the figure's perineum. Please contact Sidney Lee (sidney.lee@bonhams.com) for related condition report images.

Schätzw. 100.000 - 150.000 EUR

DEUX TANGKAS REPRÉSENTANT DES ARHATS TIBET DE L'EST, STYLE DE PALPUNG, FIN DU XIXE/DÉB... - DEUX TANGKAS REPRÉSENTANT DES ARHATS TIBET DE L'EST, STYLE DE PALPUNG, FIN DU XIXE/DÉBUT DU XXE SIÈCLE Distemper on cloth; both with inscriptions om ah hum and double handprints verso. Himalayan Art Resources item no. 4653 Image: 69.5 x 45.5 cm (27 3/8 x 17 7/8 in.), each Footnotes: TWO THANGKAS FROM AN ARHAT SERIES EASTERN TIBET, PALPUNG STYLE, LATE 19TH/EARLY 20TH CENTURY 藏東 八蚌風格 十九世紀末/二十世紀初 羅漢唐卡二幀 Provenance: With Claude de Marteau, Brussels, by 1970s Depicted in this pair of thangkas are six Arhats including Chudapantaka, Vanavasin, and Pantaka in one and Bhadra, Vajriputra, and Bakula in the other. Painted in bold tones and depicted on an open landscape, they showcase a compositional style of painting first developed by Situ Panchen at Palpung monastery. Another painting also bearing double handprints and attributed to the same school is in the Rubin Museum of Art, New York (HAR 65624). The present lot originally belonged to a set of ten paintings illustrating Shakyamuni accompanied by attendant figures, the Guardians of the Four Directions, and the Sixteen Arhats, comparing favorably to an earlier example sold at Bonhams, New York, 14 September 2015, lot 28 and HAR 31683. For further information on this lot please visit Bonhams.com

Schätzw. 3.000 - 5.000 EUR

STATUETTE DE BOUDDHA SHAKYAMUNI EN ALLIAGE DE CUIVRE DORÉ NÉPAL, XIVE SIÈCLE - STATUETTE DE BOUDDHA SHAKYAMUNI EN ALLIAGE DE CUIVRE DORÉ NÉPAL, XIVE SIÈCLE Himalayan Art Resources item no. 4615 11 cm (4 2/8 in.) high Footnotes: A GILT COPPER ALLOY FIGURE OF SHAKYAMUNI BUDDHA NEPAL, 14TH CENTURY 尼泊爾 十四世紀 銅鎏金釋迦牟尼像 Provenance: With Claude de Marteau, Brussels, by 1970s Seated crossed legged with a gesture conveying the moment the earth paid witness to his enlightenment, Shakyamuni as the historical Buddha is youthfully portrayed here with quiet contentment. This delicate casting and small scale of the figure suggests its use for personal worship. Furthermore, the broadly modelled torso, the 'rice-grain' pattern incised along the hemline, and the deeply recessed waist of the lotus base are all aesthetic features of Nepalese craftmanship. Compare the present lot's sculptural modelling to another image sold at Bonham's, Hong Kong, 2 December 2020, lot 1011. For a similar treatment of the rice-grain pattern engraved along the hemline and similarly recessed lotus base, see a sculpture sold at Bonham's, New York, 23 September 2020, lot 617. For further information on this lot please visit Bonhams.com Very good condition overall, with minor scratches and loss of gilding intermittently throughout, as is visible in images. Embedded dust in recessed areas. Remains of cold gold in the face, blue pigment in the hair, and white pigment in the eyes. The base is sealed with a later cloth baseplate. Please contact Sidney Lee (sidney.lee@bonhams.com) for related condition report images.

Schätzw. 3.000 - 5.000 EUR

STATUETTE DE MACHIK LABDRÖN EN ALLIAGE DE CUIVRE DORÉ TIBET, VERS XIVE SIÈCLE - STATUETTE DE MACHIK LABDRÖN EN ALLIAGE DE CUIVRE DORÉ TIBET, VERS XIVE SIÈCLE Himalayan Art Resources item no. 4633 13.5 cm (5 1/4 in.) high Footnotes: A GILT COPPER ALLOY FIGURE OF MACHIG LABDRON TIBET, CIRCA 14TH CENTURY 西藏 約十四世紀 銅鎏金瑪吉拉準像 Provenance: With Claude de Marteau, Brussels, by 1970s The historic figure Machig Labdron (1055-1153) was the founder of the Chod tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. She is memorialized here as a Tantric master, depicted as a sublime dakini, dancing with one leg raised, a hand drum, and a skull cup. Two Vajravarahi sculptures of similar scale and style were offered at Bonhams, Hong Kong, 19 November 2016, lot 119 and published in Bigler, Before Yongle , 2015, p. 114, pl 27. The artist's reliance on the lotus stem and sash rising from the base to support the figure's pose is a common structural feature of earlier Tibetan sculptures before the 16th century. For further information on this lot please visit Bonhams.com Very good condition overall, with minor nicks and stress cracks in the scarf, as is visible in images. Faint scratches and loss of gilding intermittently throughout. Remains of cold gold in the face, white pigment in the eyes, and blue pigment in the hair. Base plate is missing. Please contact Sidney Lee (sidney.lee@bonhams.com) for related condition report images.

Schätzw. 2.000 - 3.000 EUR

STATUETTE D'USHNISHAVIJAYA EN ALLIAGE DE CUIVRE DORÉ TIBET CENTRAL, XVE/XVIE SIÈCLE - STATUETTE D'USHNISHAVIJAYA EN ALLIAGE DE CUIVRE DORÉ TIBET CENTRAL, XVE/XVIE SIÈCLE Himalayan Art Resources item no. 4601 23.8 cm (9 3/8 in.) high Footnotes: A GILT COPPER ALLOY FIGURE OF USHNISHAVIJAYA CENTRAL TIBET, 15TH/16TH CENTURY 藏中 十五/十六世紀 銅鎏金尊勝佛母像 Provenance: With Claude de Marteau, Brussels, by 1970s Ushnishavijaya, whose name translates as 'the Victorious Crown Ornament', is a peaceful deity who bestows long life. Depicted with three distinctive faces and eight arms, the deity is crowned, jeweled and ornamented seated atop a double lotus throne. Each implement and gesture signify the giving of boons. The primary right hand holds the visvavajra , the symbol of indestructability. The second right hand holds an effigy of the Buddha Amitabha, whose name means 'Infinite Light', and whose emanation is Amitayus, represented by the vase containing the elixir of long life held in Ushnishavijaya's fourth left hand. The third arm at right holds an arrow signifying wisdom with the bow mirrored in the second left hand symbolizing compassion. The lower right hand is held in varada mudra and the third left arm is raised in abhaya mudra expressing gestures of generosity and assurance respectively. The multi-faced, many armed deity offers enduring protection and favorable rebirth to those who have devoted faith. Adhering to a 15th-century style, Ushnishavijaya shows a syncretic blend of Indo-Nepalese, Central Asian, and Chinese artistic traditions. While these stylistic exchanges were occurring earlier during the Yuan dynasty, their integration matured in the 15th century with a distinctive Tibetan style at its art historical peak. Political and economic support for these artistic developments partly came from the Early Ming emperors' patronage with Tibetan monasteries. The sending and receiving of gifts between the Early Ming court and Tibetan lamas which included texts, commentaries, silks and Buddhist imagery inspired a process of elaboration and refinement in Tibetan art, yielding casts like this delicate gilded sculpture of Ushnishavijaya. The qualities that harken back to earlier influences from India and Nepal include the lithe proportions of the body, the foliate triangular leaf crown, and the cabochon of turquoise and inlaid stones with heavy gilding which was popular in Nepalese artistic traditions. Skilled Nepalese metalworkers coming from the Kathmandu Valley had long been involved in workshops relating to specific monasteries throughout Tibet. These stylistic choices, especially in consideration of the overall layout of ornamentation can be compared to another Ushnishavijaya in the Rubin Museum of Art (C2005.16.22). While the garments and ornamentation are predominantly of Indian and Nepalese style, the modeled face, with its demure expression, is more definitively Chinese and can closely be compared to another tantric deity of Ratnasambhava in this sale (see lot 21) along with a Vairocana Buddha on Himalayan Art Resources (HAR 15711). For further information on this lot please visit Bonhams.com Excellent condition overall, with few nicks to the upper petal tips of the lotus base. Minor dents and scratches intermittently throughout, as is visible in images. Few turquoise insets are lost. A thin layer of smoky residue intermittently throughout the surface from exposure to temple butter lamps within the culture. Embedded dust also in a few recessed areas. The separately cast base with its original silver consecration plate has become distended over time due to the decomposition of organic consecration material within the sculpture. Remains of blue pigment to the hair and white residue to the neck and face. Please contact Sidney Lee (sidney.lee@bonhams.com) for related condition report images.

Schätzw. 70.000 - 90.000 EUR